Course Descriptions

JED 30108 - Advanced Reporting

This is an advanced course in journalistic reporting and writing devoted to learning how to prepare, in a professional manner, in-depth articles on issues and events of community interest for Notre Dame and this area. Emphasis will be on the techniques, ethics, and responsibilities of conducting interviews and research, and crafting pieces for newspapers and other publications. Open to American Studies majors and Journalism, Ethics, and Democracy minors by permission. Other applicants must submit writing samples for review. If you are registering for this class, you may not be enrolled in the JED 30109 -Multimedia Journalism 

JED 30109 - Multiplatform Jouranlism

Journalists today are expected to write, edit and produce content across multiple platforms. This course will expose students to a variety of media by focusing on the opportunities and challenges faced by journalists in the digital world. Course content includes the impact of speed on reliability, fact-checking and analyzes the unique design and presentational problems faced by online journalists. The course provides groundwork in storytelling techniques across multiple platforms, writing and editing for the web and mobile media, search engine optimization, critical thinking, ethics and copyright law, blogging and social media. Students will be trained and produce published journalistic content on several digital tools, including Wordpress, Twitter, Facebook, Instagram, Photoshop, video, audio editing, Periscope, mobile reporting tools and visualization tools from the Google News Lab and the Knight Lab.

 

JED 30122 -  Witnessing the Sixties

The purpose of this interdisciplinary course is twofold: to examine the social context and cultural change of the sixties and to explore the various journalistic and aesthetic representations of events, movements, and transformations. We will focus on the manner in which each writer or artist witnessed the sixties and explore fresh styles of writing and cultural expression, such as the new journalism popularized by Tom Wolfe and the music/lyrics performed by Bob Dylan. Major topics for consideration include the counterculture and the movement--a combination of civil rights and anti-war protest. 
 

JED 30126 - Data Storytelling Politics, Crime and Sports

Students will learn how to produce interactive infographics, data visualizations and charts for news consumption. They will explore how to gather data through original research, data portals and freedom of information requests. They also will learn basic computational skills and analyze data for crime, politics and sports news. Students also will learn how to map data and study how data can be flawed in the pursuit of truth-telling. Software used in the class: Google Fusion Tables (maps and charts), Datawrapper, Venngage/Infogr.am, Google Trends, Timeline JS, StoryMap JS, Excel.

JED 30468 - Ethics and Journalism

"The primary purpose of journalism," according to media observers Bill Kovach and Tom Rosenstiel, "is to provide citizens with the information they need to be free and self-governing." That's a lofty goal in any age - but it's especially difficult in the current era of market-driven journalism that has produced fabrication and plagiarism scandals, political cheerleading on news networks, "gotcha" videos on the internet and social media, and an outright obsession with celebrities. Students in this course will come away with a deep-seated understanding of journalism?s purpose, develop a disciplined and repeatable process of making sound ethical choices when confronted with tough situations, and be able to articulate ethically defensible arguments explaining their decisions. They will accomplish these goals by reading, viewing, debating, analyzing, and writing about actual cases and issues in the news. The focus will be as much on what journalists should do, as on what they should not do. 

JED 30100 - Fundamentals of Journalism

What is news? What are the most effective ways of presenting news to the public? What ethical decisions are involved in gathering and reporting news? These are a few of the questions addressed in this class. 

JED 30101 - Broadcast Journalism 

Four major topics are covered: (1) writing for broadcast: emphasis on developing the student's understanding of grammar and style in the construction of effective news stories; (2) newsroom structure: understanding who does what in today's broadcast newsroom and how economics affects the flow of information; (3) journalism ethics: analysis of personal values, ethical principles, and journalistic duties that influence newsroom decisions; and (4) legal considerations in news gathering with special attention paid to libel laws and invasion of privacy. 

JED 30112 - Persuasion, Commentary and  Criticism

This course will consider the roles of persuasion, commentary, and criticism in contemporary American culture and will explore the techniques of these forms of expression. Students will prepare and discuss their own writing assignments, including opinion columns, editorials, and critical reviews of performances or books. Ethics and responsibilities in contemporary American journalism in expression of opinions also will be explored. Assignments will serve as the examinations in this course, which is taught by a political columnist for the South Bend Tribune who also serves as host of public affairs programs on WNIT-TV, Public Broadcasting. Open to Journalism, Ethics, and Democracy minors only. Other applicants must submit writing samples for review. 

JED 301105 - Craft of Journalism

This class will focus on how print, broadcast and online journalists work—how they think and act as well as the ethical dilemmas they face today in delivering news, analysis, and commentary. We will study the processes involved in the creation of news and the effects or consequences of the news on the public. This is not a course that teaches the techniques of journalism. Rather it is an examination of the practices of professional journalists and a survey of the impact of what they do. 

JED 30120 - Fieldwork and American Documentary

This course is fashioned more like a workshop. Students will be engaged in fieldwork either on campus or in the surrounding community. By investigating and documenting people and their settings, students will combine the imaginative work of the writer with the analytical work of the intellectual. Whether conducting journalistic inquiry, in-depth interviewing, oral history, or participant observation, students will take the initiative in making contact and building rapport with their respective research subjects. This ongoing fieldwork (supplemented by readings) will be the basis for classroom discussion. That is, in addition to considering classic and exemplary texts in creative and documentary nonfiction, we?ll focus on students? fieldwork process and results in class. Final projects may take a variety of written forms: a feature or profile, an essay, or a scholarly article. Along with a written account of the fieldwork, an oral presentation is required. Students wishing to pursue community-based learning will be expected to spend at least two hours per week in a field placement for a 10-week period. 

JED 30177 - Magazine Writing

This course will examine various forms of magazine journalism, from the direct presentation of information to narrative journalism to the art of the first-person essay. The class, requiring students to complete a variety of written assignments while performing in a workshop setting, will emphasize those storytelling techniques essential to writing for publication. 

JED 30121 - Metamorphosis of Journalism

New Media and the Metamorphosis of Journalism. The traditional categories of journalism subsumed by the figures of the journalist-witness or reporter, as well as the journalist-creator and the journalist-activist (or socially engaged), might still apply in today's world. But the social function, the profession and the industry have probably changed more during the past 20 years than during the previous five decades or so. The increasing diversification of media outlets and the accessibility to technologies has generated a very large spectrum of journalistic expressions. The goal of this course is to reflect on today's profound transformation of the document, of the expression and of the audience within the activity known as journalism with a special focus on social realism. We will study a wide range of expressions including film, comics-journalism, photo-journalism, digital journalism and art. We will pay special attention to citizen journalism, media critique and social crises, journalism and war, journalism and dictatorship, journalism and literature (including theatre), corporate vs. not for profit journalism, journalism and politics, and ethics of journalism. Renowned journalists, authors and creators will join our class: photo-journalists, comics-journalists, documentary filmmakers, and writers. 

JED 30123 -American Political & Media Culture

This course is an introductory and interdisciplinary examination of American political and media culture, particularly contemporary political thinking and behavior. Although we will examine the roots and development of U.S. political culture from the nation's founding into the 21st century, a principal concern of this class will be the involvement of the mass media (journalism, broadcasting, advertising, etc.) in our political life since the 1930s. In considering politics, government, and the media, we will attempt to come to terms with the role and influence of different forms of popular communications in modern political culture. Are traditional media forms fading in significance with the rise of social media? What methods of media assessment work most effectively in analyzing political and governmental issues? Does emphasis on a public figure's personality or image--as transmitted by the media--become more important than policy positions in the citizenry's assessment? Students will read several books and individual articles throughout the semester. Grading will be based on a mid-term and a final examination as well as a short paper and a more comprehensive, detailed essay. 

JED 30124 - TV Newsroom Survival Skills

This course covers four topics essential for students to develop the competence and confidence to work in a TV or visual electronic media newsroom: (1) Writing for broadcast and visual storytelling media with emphasis on grammar, form, and style in the construction of effective news stories. (2) Anatomy of a newsroom: Understanding who does what in the newsgathering process, and how economics, ratings, and marketing affect the flow of information. (3) Journalism ethics: Analysis of personal, societal, and professional values, ethical principles, and journalistic duties that influence newsroom decisions. (4) Legal considerations in news gathering with special attention to libel/defamation laws and invasion of privacy. Note: This is not a production course. While students will write news stories and come to better understand studio production, technology, visualization, photography, and video editing as important parts of the storytelling process, the course is not designed as a vehicle for technical field training.

JED 30128 - Multiplatform Newswriting: Advanced Reporting 

This course is a skills-based survey of the world of online journalism. Students will learn the principles of digital journalism and acquire the technical skills to cover events using text, images, audio and social media. Students will also learn the nuances of writing for various contemporary media platforms, including digital print and social. It will also help instruct students how to tell textured stories - both with text and visual tools.This course aims to help students learn how to produce high-quality, quick-turnaround, short-form journalism - in short, the kinds of skills that will be required to be competitive for many entry-level journalism jobs. And the knowledge that is acquired in the course is not only applicable to journalism but also to online writing and multimedia production now commonly used in other fields. 

JED 30127 - Journalism and Society

This course is a conceptual immersion into the role of journalism in America as a catalyst for social, political, economic and cultural change. Students will learn the role and value of a free press, examine the principles of reporting and consider the evolving impact of social media and digital technology on the field today.

JED 45900 -  Magazine Internship 

Apprentice training  with Notre Dame Magazine

JED 45903 -  News Internship 

Apprentice training with  newspapers. 

JED 47930 - JED Internship

A professional work experience in journalism for non-resident and resident internships.